The longest running Blues Community in the North End.

The longest running Blues Community in the North End.

September 29 - John Gordon Blues Project

John Gordon Blues Project will be hosting the jam this Thursday, September 29. Come early to put your name on the list and get ready for a night of fun playing the music we all love. Be prepared to play the blues with your songs, sticks, guitar, amplifier, harmonica, keyboard, saxophone, (Kazoo?!!) voice...whatever!!! Music starts at 9:00. Food available until 8:30. Beer available all night!!

John Gordon Blues Project

John Gordon Blues Project

JGBP in shorts!

JGBP in shorts!

enjoying the jam

enjoying the jam

LIVE EVENTS SCHEDULE 2016


Thursday Jam Sessions run from 9:00pm till 1:00am.
Bring your instruments. All Welcome.
LATEST NEWS: NEW BILINGUAL WEBSITE FOR MAISON DU BLUES
Follow us also at this link:
http://www.lesjeudisblues.com/

Schedule of Host bands for Thursday night jams, 2016



July 7 - Pete Webb Trio

July 14 - Pat Loiselle Trio

July 21 - Crawdaddy V2.1

July 28 - Anniversary Jam Night

Aug 4 - John Gordon Blues Project

Aug 11 - Louis Janelle

Aug 18 - Paul Arthur and Raisin' Cain

Aug 25 - Last Stop Blues Band

September 1 - Paul Arthur and Raisin' Cain

September 8 - Hawk N Roll

September 15 - Pat Loiselle Trio

September 22 - Lil' Bubba Blues Band

September 29 - John Gordon Blues Project

October 6 - Better Days









(Check out the blues videos at the bottom of the page.
Go to " About maison du blues"
Click on a video
Scroll down to bottom of page to watch.
If video does not load, click on YOUTUBE box at bottom right-hand corner of video and it should work.)


Also there are feature and profile interviews with local musicians.





The magic no. of 30,000 page views was passed in May 2015, with the no. of hits to date (February 2016) totalling over
36,000 for the main web page.

See below for more Maison du Blues stats.















Follow us on Picasaweb:

https://profiles.google.com/113814927649315529054?hl=en#113814927649315529054/about


Maison du Blues wishes to thank Gerry Goodfriend of CKUT Radio for his support of the jam session.
Listen to his great Folk Directions show on CKUT 90.3FM Radio every Thursday from 9am-11am.

check out:

http://www.ckutfolk.com/






















Pat Loiselle

Pat Loiselle

Boaz

Boaz

Ken's jam band

Ken's jam band

Andre

Andre

Gerry

Gerry

Hugo

Hugo

Paul Arthur and Rich James

Paul Arthur and Rich James

Ross

Ross

Pierre

Pierre

Hawk

Hawk

Paul Arthur and Raisin' Cain

Paul Arthur and Raisin' Cain

Guillaume

Guillaume

John Gordon Blues Project

John Gordon Blues Project

Eddie Blake Eaton

Eddie Blake Eaton

Pat Loiselle

Pat Loiselle

Hawk blowing the harp

Hawk blowing the harp

jam band

jam band

Jules

Jules

Sonny and Drey

Sonny and Drey
Thanks to Sonny and Drey for stopping by the jam, playing some real, down home, Texas blues.Hope to see you again soon guys.

Paul and Warren

Paul and Warren

STATS - STATS - STATS ! ! !


For anyone who is interested in statistics, Maison du Blues blog has received over 40,000 hits since its inception in June 2010.

Roughly 70% of page views came from Canada, 20% from the U.S., and 10% from Germany, France and Britain, as well as hits from various other places around the world.

Every month, our blog is looked at by an average of between 750 and 850 people, mainly from Canada, followed by the U.S. and Germany.
In July, our blues community blog received a record 911 hits.


The total no. of hits to date for the main webpage, as of
September 2016, is 40,869.












jam band

jam band

Frank and Louis

Frank and Louis

Eloi

Eloi

jam band

jam band

George Groove

George Groove

Louis Janelle

Louis Janelle

Sonny Wolf

Sonny Wolf

Phil

Phil

Alain

Alain

Lewis

Lewis

Serge and Steve

Serge and Steve

Jules and Paul

Jules and Paul

JF

JF

Phil and John

Phil and John

Guy "bass cat"

Guy "bass cat"

Guillaume

Guillaume

Let's party !!! (thanks to Dan Geneau for photo)

Let's party !!! (thanks to Dan Geneau for photo)

Dance workout 1 (thanks to Dan Geneau for photo)

Dance workout 1 (thanks to Dan Geneau for photo)

Dance workout 2 (thanks to Dan Geneau for photo)

Dance workout 2 (thanks to Dan Geneau for photo)

John Gordon Blues Project (John, Steve, Rich and Guy)

John Gordon Blues Project (John, Steve, Rich and Guy)

JGBP (thanks to Dan Geneau for photo)

JGBP (thanks to Dan Geneau for photo)

Jean-Marc

Jean-Marc

Jean-marc Interview - thanks to Leslie

1. Name, place of birth, where living now?

I was born in Montréal (Outremont Stuart & Van Horne) Now I live in Laval

2. When and how did you first get involved with music?

I have enjoyed music for as long as I remember. I listened to my parents’ jazz album, a mix of swing tunes over and over - fascinated by the drums

3. Which instruments do you play?

Mainly drums and guitar and lately harmonicas (a work in progress)

4. Describe your first instrument.

My father gave me a guitar for Xmas when I was twelve. It was right handed one. I’m a lefty - the teacher didn’t believe in left-handed people so that was the end of that.

5. How did you get interested in these instruments?

At the age of 14 my dad bought me my first drum kit - no cymbals. At school a friend sold me a high hat and a very low-end ride. That was enough to get me started.

6. Is your family musical?

Only listeners. My mother listened to Gilbert Bécaud, Dean Martin... My sister was more into rock n roll. Mostly they would listen to the radio and Ed Sullivan on TV.

7. What are your fondest musical memories?

In 1967 my parents took me to the universal expo at Ile Ste-Hélêne at the Bavarian beer garden and I played a song on the drums with the band - never having played on a drum set before.

8. What was the first tune you learned?

“If I Had a Hammer”.

9. Who was your first teacher?

When I was twelve I joined a group of youngsters called L'Harmonie de Terrebonne and played the snare drum. The teacher was Mr. Jean-Paul Cadieux, who taught all instruments (horns and percussion). At school I got some lessons from guys who played in a band.

10. What are your influences in the Blues?

The shuffle is my favourite of all rhythms.

11. Which famous musicians do you admire and why?

Anybody who will go to any length to learn how to play.

12. Are there local musicians that you like, that you would recommend to go and see play?

Lately I've been enjoying jam nights around town - very friendly people. Turn off that TV or PC and get out there - it's live 'n' kickin’ out there...haha !!!

13. What makes a player unique?

Listening to many different styles and being able learn and play back that stuff - even if it's hard.

14. Which famous musicians have you learned from?

The very first album I listened to was Buddy Rich – also Gene Krupa playing Bernie's tune.

15. Do you have a favourite song, record or CD that has influenced you?

I listen to so much stuff...okay - John Bonham - ''Moby Dick''.

Thanks Jean-Marc.

It was a pleasure.


Eddy

Eddy

John (thanks to Dan Geneau for photo)

John (thanks to Dan Geneau for photo)

Lowdown Lewis

Lowdown Lewis

Jam band

Jam band

Andre, Ria Reece, Martin

Andre, Ria Reece, Martin

Rejean, Jean-Pierre, Hugo

Rejean, Jean-Pierre, Hugo

Do you like the Blues? Do you play ?Check out the Blues Jam on Thursdays at La Maison du Blues Unik.

Show starts at 9:00pm. Free admission.



Bring your instruments.



805,Decarie (metro du College)



Come listen to all your blues favourites: Paul Arthur, Raisin' Cain, John Gordon Blues Project, Crawdaddy, Steve Rudinsky, Guy Desrosiers, George Groove, Gilbert Fleury, Hugo Bonin, Pat Loiselle, Hawk 'n' Roll, Li'l Bubba, Sebastien, Rejean, Sonny Wolf and Drey Butcher, Boaz, Warren Gross, Ria Reece, Andre Chevarie, Miche-Love, Dan Geneau, Ken Cohen, Louis Janelle, Lud, Richard Pearl, Benny Gingues, Rich James, Gaetan Montpetit, Gary Millward, Tino Mancini, Alain, Lowdown Lewis, Phil Andrews, Serge, Roberto, Andre, Gerry Michel, Jean-Pierre, Kevin Hughes, Luc, Pete Webb, Ross De Costa, Perry, Johnny Guitar and many others.





Jam Sessions:Bring your instruments: drums and amps supplied by house band.


Follow us on Twitter:

http://twitter.com/#!/maisondublues

Check out our Facebook page and like us - Brasserie L'Unik Jam Session



See you there.








Warren, Nienke, Benny

Warren, Nienke, Benny

Pete Webb interview - thanks to Leslie

1. Name, place of birth, where living now:

Pete Webb, born in Sherbrooke, QC; currently living in Sherbrooke, QC

2. When and how did you first get involved in music?

I started playing guitar in my teens after my parents bought me an acoustic guitar for Christmas. When we moved to Stratford, Ontario in the 1980s, I had been playing about a year when a couple of kids I met in a music store asked me to play rhythm guitar in their heavy metal band. I wasn’t very good and they kicked me out after a couple of months, but it got me started.

3. What instruments do you play?

Guitar and a bit of bass and harmonica. I’m also a lead singer.

4. Describe your first instrument. Other instruments.

I’m primarily an electric guitarist, rock and blues; mainly self-taught. I’ve sung for a long time and had formal vocal training in the early 1990s. Bass and harmonica are just instruments I’ve picked up along the way.

5. How did you get interested in these instruments?

My parents were from England and brought all the original Beatles albums with them to Canada. I grew up hearing these and pretty much idolized the Beatles, especially George Harrison. My Dad had a friend, Dave Gordon, who played guitar and loved Eric Clapton. When I was twelve, Dave gave me a few guitar lessons and took me to one of his band rehearsals at the hotel in Waterville, Quebec. Seeing a band play live for the first time got me hooked.

6. Is your family musical?

My immediate family was not musical in the sense of being musicans. But they were all huge music listeners.

7. Family members’ musical interests….

My Mum loved The Beatles, Jose Feliciano, and Glen Campbell. My Dad liked a lot of jazz and R&B, including Dave Brubeck, Isaac Hayes and Dionne Warwick. My three older sisters were into seventies rock such as Led Zeppelin, The Eagles, and Rod Stewart. The whole family also listened to classical music. So there was a lot of music around the house.

8. What are your fondest musical memories?

My parents playing records at home when I was a kid, on our quadraphonic home stereo that was state of the art at the time.

A later experience: In the early-1990s, I spent several months living and playing in Germany. On a short tour of the former East Germany, I was booked to play in a large church in a small town called Plau-am-Sea. This was very soon after the fall of the Iron Curtain and well outside the cultural centre of Berlin. There was a good deal of anticipation of having a “Western” musican come to play in Plau. The church was packed that night. It was just me and an acoustic guitar and a small P.A. After my regular set of original songs, the audience wanted more. So, starting with Elvis and Buddy Holly and moving my way forward, I played the people of Plau the history of rock ‘n roll – the first time most of these East Germans would have ever heard such a thing performed live.

9. First tune learned.

I don’t remember the actual first tune, but within my first six months or so of playing I learned things like “Hotel California” and “Smoke on the Water.”

10. Who was your first teacher? Any other teachers?

Mr. Lacroix, at the Honolulu music store in Sherbrooke, gave me several lessons, but I quit before long and was mostly self-taught after that. Much later, in Ontario, I did take voice lessons with a former professional opera singer for two years.

11. What are your influences in the blues?

My favourite blues songs are probably those of Robert Johnson. From a guitarist’s point of view, Robben Ford, Duane Allman, and Rory Gallagher are among my favourites. Among vocalists, Sam Cooke, Marvin Gaye, and Van Morrison are tops.

12. Which famous musicians do you admire and why?

Robben Ford: Consummate musicianship, yet his music is always accessible and in spite of amazing guitar chops he always puts the song first/ rarely overplays. Plus, he seems like a modest and down to earth person in interviews.

Stevie Wonder: Probably the world’s greatest living all-around talent. Blind since birth, he became one of the world’s greatest singers, songwriters, and multi-instrumentalists. A true genius in my opinion.

Paul McCartney: He could have rested on his laurels decades ago and remained a legend – yet he keeps on touring and making new music, and always seems to play with enjoyment and integrity. He keeps aging but never seems “old” – and as I age myself, I find that inspiring.

13. Local musicans I like and would recommend…

Paul Arthur immediately springs to mind. I’ve known Paul about three years, have played with him on several occasions. He seems to epitomize the blues, and younger players can learn a lot from watching his commitment to the music and performing.

Ria Reece, Blues Z, Louis Janelle, George Papafylis – other local musicians people should go and see.

14. What makes a player unique?

Not worrying too much about current trends, but sticking to what feels natural. Not overtly copying other artists – turning musical tips into your own bag of tricks. Paying attention to groove and melody, not just showing off fast chops or technique for its own sake.

15. Which famous musicians have you learned from?

Warren Haynes: He has a book + CD course on slide guitar that taught me a lot about slide guitar technique.

BB King: I’ve spent many hours working through BB solos note for note, learning how economy of playing style can benefit one much more than pure speed or showing off.

16. Favourite songs, records, etc…

Among blues albums, some favourites are:

- Albert King, Born Under a Bad Sign

- Skip James, Devil Got My Woman

- Robert Johnson, King of the Delta Blues Singers

- Robben Ford, Bringing It Back Home

- Muddy Waters, Hard Again

- Allman Brothers, Live at Fillmore East

17. How would you describe the type of sound you have or would like to achieve?

I try to play fairly clean and economically, without a lot of effects pedals and so on. I’m not a flashy, over-the-top type of player. I try to play what is best for the song. I have a few guitars (Fenders, a Gibson, a Guild, etc.) that help me achieve different tones without any fancy tricks. I guess one trademark is I play a fair amount of slide guitar – so that’s one sound particular to my style.

18. Competitions and prizes.

I avoid competitions of any kind. I dislike being “competitive” in music.

19. What groups have you played with/ do you play with?

I currently play in several different bands: I’m the singer-guitarist in two blues bands, the Pete Webb Trio (based in Montreal) and the Sherby Blues Project (based in Sherbrooke). I’m the lead guitarist in an original rock band called The Fleming Sweep, based in Sherbrooke. I do a fair amount of “on call” stuff, where I play shows with anyone who needs a guitarist or singer on fairly short notice. Styles range from blues to rock to country, and I can play guitar, bass, and sing – so I’m pretty versatile.

20. Do you prefer the studio or live?

I used to do a lot of studio work back in the 1990s. I was even trained as a recording engineer at college back in the late 80s. But I much prefer the live experience to working in the studio.

21. What is your ideal gig (large or small venue)?

I’ve only played on really large stages a few times, and generally didn’t like it. I much prefer a mid-sized club with a receptive audience who is there to hear the music. Some of the best shows I’ve played over the past few years have been organized concerts in club venues for audiences of around 60-100 people, where the audience is attuned to the type of show and prepared to enjoy themselves.

22. Do you get nervous before a show?

Very rarely, actually. I’m a teacher in my daytime profession and have performed music for around 30 years, so being in front of an audience is pretty natural for me.

23. Is it more nerve-wracking to play in front of friends, other musicans, or a regular crowd?

As above, “nerve-wracking” is not something I experience very often. I’ve only had negative experiences when the gig involves playing for people who don’t care about the music – like at a couple of corporate events I’ve done in the last few months.

24. How do you handle mistakes in a performance?

Mistakes happen in nearly every performance. The main trick is not to react physically – most of the audience won’t notice. If it’s really noticeable, laugh it off or joke about it. Everyone’s human and none of this stuff is life or death.

25. How often and how long do you practice?

During “at home” time, it is probably an average of two hours per day. Although because of the number of projects I’m in, I’m at 3-hour band practices two or three nights a week.

26. What do you practice?

I mostly just practice songs and work out different ideas for soloing. From time to time, I’ll learn a particular solo or series of licks from a recording… something that pushes me to the limits of my ability so that I learn something new. I practice scales and finger exercises sometimes to keep my improvisational skills up to par.

27. Is playing a job, sheer pleasure, or both?

Sheer pleasure.

28. What is your next project?

I’d like to start a rhythm and blues band to play classic Motown/ Soul/ R&B. I love that type of music but have only dabbled in it over the years. I know a few musicians I may call upon to get such a project going.

29. What do you think of jam sessions, and how often do you attend them?

In general, jams are a great way to meet new musicians and make friends. A lot of my current musical activities and connections stem from people I met at jams. Because I’m quite busy gigging and keeping up a full-time teaching career, I rarely attend jams unless I am hired to host. Though I do enjoy it when I get the chance.

30. What makes a good jam session? Likes or dislikes?

If people listen to each other, play to the song instead of their ego, and don’t show off or try to upstage others, it’s a good jam. Unfortunately, many times people don’t adhere to these simple principles. There are regular jams I avoid/ have avoided in the past, simply because I can’t stand the attitudes to be found there.

31. What advice would you give to an aspiring player?

Don’t be a musical snob. Listen to all styles and types of artists and learn what you can from each of them. Don’t obsess over gear/ not owning the “right” guitar or amp, etc. Don’t let your ego get the better of you. Be gracious and personable: if people don’t like you they won’t want to work with you. At the same time, you are not obligated to take crap from anyone. Stand up for yourself if the going gets rough.

32. Do you teach or have ever taught music?

I’m a college and university professor by profession. I’ve taught several courses in popular music and popular culture. So, yes, teaching is a pretty big part of my life as well as performing.

33. How do you balance your music with other obligations: mate, children, job?

I’m lucky to have a wife who plays piano and is very into music herself (classical mostly). We have a piano and violins at home and my two children are learning. My daughter (age 6) has performed in several community concerts and passed her Grade 2 conservatory exam in piano. So, you could say I am blessed to be a member of a musical household where we all support and encourage each other.


Rich, Ramy, Steve and Guy

Rich, Ramy, Steve and Guy

Richard

Richard

Pierre, Rich, Guy (thanks to Dan Geneau for the photo)

Pierre, Rich, Guy (thanks to Dan Geneau for the photo)

5IEME ANNIVERSAIRE DE MAISON DU BLUES

5IEME ANNIVERSAIRE DE MAISON DU BLUES

5th Anniversary

5th Anniversary

5th Anniversary

5th Anniversary

New drummer

New drummer

Acoustic Jam

Acoustic Jam

The Boys

The Boys

Steve

Steve

Jam band

Jam band

Jean-Marc

Jean-Marc

Alan and Boaz

Alan and Boaz

double sax

double sax

Hugo, Alain, John, André

Hugo, Alain, John, André

Derek Trucks - Jammin'

Hey,
We can all use some advice from time to time.
Here are some tips about jamming’ from Derek Trucks, of the Allman Brothers.
1. Just listen.
Make sure that when you're on stage with others, you are paying attention to what's going on and not getting self-involved in your own world.
2. Respect everyone else's musical space.
The easiest way to kill a vibe is by jumping in and adding your two cents too soon, while someone else is still trying to build something. Just let things happen.
3. Make you sure you are telling a story.
Never just be playing scales, filling space or going through the motions. Sometimes people resort to such tactics just to fill space but it's always a
mistake. Longer solos aren't always better solos. Always have something to say.
4. Try to play an emotion.
Always be aware of what emotion you want to convey and try to tap into it.
You can often hear what a great soloist is going through. It doesn't take words to express a thought; you can definitely spell out emotions musically
and should always strive to do so.
5. Never use the bandstand to practice.
Don't waste time working through things. It's great to take chances but not to try things you are completely unsure of. Save your practice time for off stage.
6. Treat the stage as your church.
Respect what you are doing. If you want people to respect what you're doing and think it means something, you have to act like it does. All great
artists treat the stage like it is sanctified.
7. Make sure your intentions are right.
Don't be up there to boost your ego or career. Mean what you're doing and appreciate it. You won't get anywhere musically if you are just on stage to
impress people.
8. Always make the band sound better.
Don't just highlight what you do; serve the group and the music. Playing rhythm behind someone or even sitting out at the right moment is just as
important as soloing. Some people sound great when they're doing their thing but just get in the way when they're not.
9. Educate with your music.
Always move forward and turn your audience on to new things instead of relying on the same old tricks. A core audience gets stuck listening to one group and think that's it, but you're around so much music and should always be inspired by new things. It's important to pass that along, and it keeps you out of ruts.
10. Make sure you mean what you're doing.
Do what you want and love. If you're playing with somebody, you might as well do it right. No matter what the gig, dig in and go to town.
Well, thanks Derek, and now to the important job of jammin’. See you Thursday.

The Cast

The Cast

jam band

jam band

Pete Webb Trio

Pete Webb Trio

Lyne Bernard and Better Days hosting August 13

Lyne Bernard and Better Days hosting August 13

Maison du Blues Jam Session every Thursday 9pm-1am.

Free admission to Jam night.
Come play some new licks.
All welcome.

Raisin' Cain

Raisin' Cain

John

John

Rusty Hip Shakers

Rusty Hip Shakers

bassist

bassist

white tele

white tele

Gaetan, Hugo, Alain, Rich, Drey

Gaetan, Hugo, Alain, Rich, Drey

Jam band March

Jam band March

Tino and Drey

Tino and Drey

harmonica player

harmonica player

Gaetan

Gaetan

John and Alan

John and Alan

Luc

Luc

Drey

Drey

Phil and Dan

Phil and Dan

Rejean, Steve and George Groove

Rejean, Steve and George Groove

Annie, the "boss"

Annie, the "boss"

New jammers

New jammers

Martin

Martin

guitarist

guitarist

guitar harmonica

guitar harmonica

John at History of the Blues

John at History of the Blues

Paul and jam band

Paul and jam band

Pierre

Pierre

Alain

Alain

Phil

Phil

Seb, Ken, Don, John, George Groove and Pat

Seb, Ken, Don, John, George Groove and Pat

Tino and Benny

Tino and Benny

Alan and Gaetan

Alan and Gaetan

Charles and George Groove

Charles and George Groove

Facebook

Come and visit our Facebook link at

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Brasserie-LUnik-Blues-Jam/293606720741091?fref=ts

Add your photos and comments.

Guest singer

Guest singer

Annie and dancers

Annie and dancers

Everyone's having a good time - August 29

Everyone's having a good time - August 29

History of the Blues

Daria

Daria

Pat Gilbert

Pat Gilbert

Ken and Seb

Ken and Seb

Jam - July 17, 2014

Jam - July 17, 2014

Jam - July 17, 2014

Jam - July 17, 2014

Ria Reece band comes to jam

Ria Reece band comes to jam

Annie

Annie

Evolution Blues Band

Evolution Blues Band

Ria and André

Ria and André

BLUES EXTRAVAGANZA - 20th June 2013

Maison du Blues is proud to have presented, on occasion of its 3rd anniversary, a night of all blues, featuring 4 live Blues.

The Schedule included:

9pm - Blues Side Up

10pm - John Gordon Blues Project

11pm - Taste of Blues with Chissy

12am - Paul Arthur and Raisin' Cain

12:45am - Grande finale with all musicians back on stage

The Montreal Blues community has been going from strength to strength over the past 3 years.

Last year saw the first ever blues live stream from Montreal at the Unik. A big thanks goes to Roger Guetta, who filmed the event, and all those bands and individual musicians who came along to play. THANK YOU - we had a great time.

The Blues Extravaganza carried on in the same vein, with the same atmosphere. It was a true reflection of the blues, as well as the sense of togetherness that has slowly been built up over the years, bringing under one roof some of Montreal's finest musicians in a mood of fun and friendship.

Come on down and experience it for yourself. Look out for celebrations on the 4th Anniversary of the jam sessions - we haven't got a name for it yet, so we will call it Blues Extravaganza 2 for the moment - because that's what it will be - a celebration of the blues, to be filmed and edited as a video to be broadcast at a later date. We would like you to be part of it.

Please watch this space for further information.

Roger Guetta

Roger Guetta

2nd Year Birthday Bash of Jam Session



Maison du Blues wishes to thank Roger Guetta for his camera extraordinaire .





BLUES EXTRAVAGANZA - the day after

Our 3rd anniversary celebration was a huge success. By all accounts everyone had a great time. The food which was provided (free) by the brasserie management was greatly appreciated. The general atmosphere was truly a community feeling - a community of friendly blues music lovers.

The four bands did a commendable job of entertaining the crowd presenting four different styles of blues music - Blues Side Up giving us a British/Peter Green feeling, John Gordon Blues Project giving us a Chicago feel, Taste of Blues presenting a female side of the blues and finally Raisin' Cain giving us masterful interpretation of some of the classics with fantastic guitar playing, singing and harp playing.

The evening was capped off with a jam of all of the musicians and a few guests including Ken Cohen singing and Kevin Hughes on harmonica. THANKS TO EVERYONE and especially Roger Guetta for filming the event and setting up interviews.

For pictures, videos and interviews, check out the website at:

http://bluesextravaganza.yolasite.com/


or scroll down this page to the video section.






Friday, October 4, 2013

John Gordon Blues Project

The John Gordon Blues Project hosts the jam this Thursday 10th Oct0ber 2013.
Performers welcome.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012















Profile Interview with Dave Whitehouse

1. What instrument(s) do you play?
Bass
>
> 2. What equipment are you using? (ie guitars, bass, amps, harmonica, drums, sax
> etc.)
> Berringer
>
> 3. Have you modified your set-up in any way to better suit your style of
> playing.

> No

> 4. Is there any instrument that you owned, but sold and now regret it?

> Yes

> 5. How did you first get interested in your instrument?

> Beatles
>
> 6. What are your influences in the blues?

> John Mayall

> 7. Are there any particular players on the world stage who have had an effect on
> your playing?

> Jack Bruce

> 8. Can you recommend any soundtrack/video/DVD of these players?

> No
>
> 9. How would you describe the type of sound you have or would like to achieve
.
> Fender

> 10. If money was no object, what equipment would you like to use at a medium
> sized gig? (50 seater)

> Fender
>
> > 11. What, in your view, makes a player special/unique (past or present)

> Understanding music theory

> 12. What are your favourite songs?

> Aqualung

> 13. How long have you been playing?

> Since 1966

> 14. Are you presently in a group or working on any projects with other
> musicians? (name the other members if you like and what they play)

> Yes

> 15. Do you like working in the studio, prefer to go out and play, or both?
> (please elaborate if you can)

> Both
>
> 16. Are there any local musicians that you would recommend to go and see play
> who you like the most?

> No
>
> 17. Which local musician(s) have had an effect on your own playing?
> None

> 18. How did you first get involved with music? (ie. listened to a record, friend
> introduced you to an album, went to a club to see someone play)

> Listening to records

> 19. Do you practice often (ie. learn new songs, go over the ones you know, or
> just fiddle around?

> Every day

> 20.Share with us your ideal gig (ie. large or small venue, do you like to get
> there very early to set up, do you expect other band members to do the same, who
> does the sound or works the board. – anything at all about your approach to
> playing)

> Playing outside

> 21. Is playing for you a job to be worked hard at, shear pleasure, or a mixture
> of both?

> both

> 22. What do you think of jam sessions? (please elaborate likes and dislikes)

> They are all right

> 23. Do you prefer to work out your music in advance, or do you like a certain
> amount of improvisation?

> Certain amount of improvisation
>
> > 24. Have there been any experiences that made you nervous on stage?

> No
>
> 25. Is it more nerve-wracking for you to play in front of friends, other
> musicians or a regular bar crowd?

> No difference

> 26. What’s the best or worst gig you played?

> Private party at expo 67

> 27. Do you have any other anecdotes you could share with us. (pleasant or
> unpleasant)
> none

> 28. What advice would you give to an aspiring young player? ( ie. Technique,
> style, equipment etc.- any mistakes to avoid?)

> Lots of practice
>
> 29. What’s your next project/gig/musical experience? (give place and dates if
> you like)

> Keep playing

Thanks Dave

Monday, October 25, 2010

Monday, July 26, 2010

John Gordon - Profile Interview


John Gordon – Profile Interview


1. What instrument(s) do you play?

Guitar, piano, harmonica

2. What equipment are you using? (ie guitars, bass, amps, harmonica, drums, sax etc.)

Les Paul, Strat, Epiphone ES175, Gibson J45, Orange Rocker30 amp, Fender Deluxe Reverb amp, Fender Pro Junior amp, acoustic upright Weber piano, various harmonicas


3. What are your influences in the blues?

I go through stages – right now I am fascinated with Howlin’ Wolf


4. How long have you been playing? - 43 years

5. Are you presently in a group or working on any projects with other musicians? (name the other members if you like and what they play) –
I play in 2Hands – a blues band



6. Are there any local musicians that you would recommend to go and see play who you like the most? - Bharath and His Rhythm Four, Stephen Barry Blues Band


7. Do you practice often (ie. learn new songs, go over the ones you know, or just fiddle around? – all the time – every spare moment when I do not have other responsibilities


8. What do you think of jam sessions? (please elaborate likes and dislikes) - I love jam sessions. I would say that it’s a great way to learn, meet other musicians, really positive night out, but usually too loud

9. Do you prefer to work out your music in advance, or do you like a certain amount of improvisation? - I like to go prepared to jams, but always like to “sit in” with other musicians



10. What advice would you give to an aspiring young player? ( ie. Technique, style, equipment etc.- any mistakes to avoid?) –
play all of the time with as many different musicians as possible

Thanks John

Neil Hebert - Profile Interview














Neil Hebert – Profile Interview


1. What instrument(s) do you play?
Electric bass, guitar, vocals

2. What equipment are you using? (ie guitars, bass, amps, harmonica, drums, sax etc.)

Fender Jazz fretless, Musicman Stingray, Squire TB
Markbass head and cabinet
Fender Super Champ, Fender Super Reverb

3. Have you modified your set-up in any way to better suit your style of playing.

Just do my own setups.

4. Is there any instrument that you owned, but sold and now regret it? No

5. How did you first get intested in your instrument?
Teenage madness

6. What are your influences in the blues?
Classic black blues – Little Walter, Willie Dixon, Robert Johnston, Muddy Waters

7. Are there any particular players on the world stage who have had an effect on your playing?

I wish.

8. Can you recommend any soundtrack/video/DVD of these players?
Anything by Vic Wooten, Pino Palladino, Willie Dixon, Willie Weeks

9. How would you describe the type of sound you have or would like to achieve.
Depends on the music, but usually pure and articulate.

10. If money was no object, what equipment would you like to use at a medium sized gig? (50 seater)
My Jazz bass through my Markbass Amp


11. What, in your view, makes a player special/unique (past or present)
How much he/she enjoys playing.

12. What are your favourite songs?
Too many and change often.

13. How long have you been playing?
Bass – about 15 years, not counting teenage years.

14. Are you presently in a group or working on any projects with other musicians? (name the other members if you like and what they play) Yes. Several.

15. Do you like working in the studio, prefer to go out and play, or both? (please elaborate if you can)
Gigging is the beast.

16. Are there any local musicians that you would recommend to go and see play who you like the most?

17. Which local musician(s) have had an effect on your own playing? Stephen Barry, Maypo

18. How did you first get involved with music? (ie. listened to a record, friend introduced you to an album, went to a club to see someone play)
Heard The Shadows and The Ventures.

19. Do you practice often (ie. learn new songs, go over the ones you know, or just fiddle around?
All of the above.

20.Share with us your ideal gig (ie. large or small venue, do you like to get there very early to set up, do you expect other band members to do the same, who does the sound or works the board. – anything at all about your approach to playing)
My favourite gigs have been outdoor concerts aqnd private parties. 300 people for rock, or 100 for blues.

21. Is playing for you a job to be worked hard at, shear pleasure, or a mixture of both?
Pleeaasuure

22. What do you think of jam sessions? (please elaborate likes and dislikes)
Cool when people listen to each other.

23. Do you prefer to work out your music in advance, or do you like a certain amount of improvisation?
Both.

24. Have there been any experiences that made you nervous on stage?
Yeah. I plugged a mono chord into the stereo output of a borrowed Rickenbacher and couldn’t figure out the problem.


25. Is it more nerve-wracking for you to play in front of friends, other musicians or a regular bar crowd?
Doesn’t depend on the crowd (unless they’re mean).

26. What advice would you give to an aspiring young player? ( ie. Technique, style, equipment etc.- any mistakes to avoid?)
Get out and have fun.

Thanks Neil.


Apart from private projects, Neil is playing Smoke Meat Pete’s on the 31st July, 2010 and Maison de Blues on the 2nd September, 2010.

"Jam Sessions" by Rich James














Rich James on Jam Sessions 25th July 2010

Reading through the Musician Profiles and Interviews on Maison de Blues website has been a rewarding experience for me. Every time I read someone’s comments about their own personal likes and dislikes, or the equipment they use, or whether they like, or don’t like jam sessions, I reflect on myself and see a lot of everyone else in me, and me in everyone else.

Who has not had the experience of turning up at a jam session, not knowing how you are going to be received, or at what time you are being called on to play?

It can be quite nerve-wracking to go to a new jam, even though we may feel secure in knowing the people in charge are musicians just like ourselves. Some of the inner thoughts and feelings can be, what songs are going to be chosen, am I tuned up, which amp am I going to use? Is the bass player going to be friendly or not?

It can be quite intimidating at a jam. Often, we are the stranger in the midst of others. We look around to find a friendly or familiar face. You can’t hide or slink away; everyone saw you bring your guitar case in. You have to just sit there and wait. Do you put your name on a list, or do you just ask the lead singer when you can get up?

Most times, your are in a bar. But be careful, don’t drink too much – it won’t help the playing. But how do you pass the time? Sure, you can listen to the house band and other jammers, but you want to be fresh and focused when you go up. Too many extra sounds can spoil one’s own concentration.

Keep your ears open for the magic call, when your name is bellowed out the speakers – “next on the list we have Rich; are you tuned up?” You sure better be tuned up before you go on stage; it’s no good fiddling with the pegs when the band is about to start. At least you are up there – now you can relax; your name was called and you have the stage for the next little while. Things went smoothly this time. There was a list.

Sometimes, there is no list. The host band’s friends may be playing a lot more than others in cases like this. Not all jams are run democratically. In this case, one has to ease oneself into the limelight enough to get noticed and hope for the best. Sidle up to the lead singer and let them know you are there to jam. They may not have a list – ah, this is where things get complicated. Keep reminding him you are there to play.This part can get hard after the 2nd set and the band has gone outside for a prolonged break!

How long do we get to play as jammers? A majority of jams I’ve been to only let the player on stage for 2 or 3 songs at the most. If you are very accomplished, you may stay up longer.

What about equipment? Some players bring their own amps to jam. Others use the house equipment; but there you are taking a chance – another unknown quality to be reckoned with in a jam! Can I get the sound I’m looking for with another person’s amp?

The most often complaint I’ve heard about Jams is that they are too loud. The worst case is when the House Band starts off too loud. You can be sure, friends, as the evening wears on, it going to get even louder!

Hosting a jam can be difficult. You are dealing with all kinds of players - and personalities too! There are the impatient ones, who constantly ask when they are going to get up. Some are jealous and say “ I was here before him or her, but they went up before me!” The host has to try to balance all these things.

One interesting suggestion I heard from Guillaume Boux, of the Black Hats, was that the host should discuss what songs people want to play before they get up there. There are obvious advantages to that – musicians can be more prepared and the music will probably be better.

What about the focus of a Jam? Well, here I think thorny and dark the path is. Sometimes the house band sees it as a mild inconvenience to allow other players up, but suffers them because it’s jam night.

Other house bands enjoy the diversity of players and see it as a chance to meet and interact with other players. Some of the best evenings I have been to have been jams.

So, with all this in mind, how can we, as jammers, and those who are hosts, approach the “dreaded” jam night.

My take on it is this. Hosts, be friendly and welcome the jammer. Get his or her name on a list as soon as they present themselves. Tell them when they can expect to play. Keep the person(s) informed, and DON’T skulk off for a prolonged break without warning, leaving people uniformed. After all, the jammers are your bread and butter that night. Treat them with respect – you’ll make a new friend and ally, or bring an old friend closer to you.

Jammers, be patient and appreciate the difficulties of running a jam. Be prepared when it’s time to play – no tuning up on stage. As a jammer, I usually prepare a note of 5-6 tunes with the key written in, so that when I’m up there, if I’m called on to do one, it’s ready.

There are probably many more tips one could add to being a good host or jammer. I hope some of us will write our own and share them on this site. A Jam Session is a great way of bringing musicians together and also paying the rent. The bottom line is: we are there for each other.

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Jules Cacchione Profile










Profile Interview with Jules Cacchione

1. What instrument(s) do you
play? drums

2. What equipment are you
using? (ie guitars, bass, amps, harmonica, drums, sax etc.)
sonor 10 and 14" maple toms, 20" birch bass drum, and 13" dixon maple snare. 14" zyldjian hihats, 18 paiste crash, and 20"sabian ride

3. Have you modified your
set-up in any way to better suit your style of playing.
I play fairly simply, and I like a small kit that's easy to transport and set up, and fits on small stages.
4. Is there any instrument
that you owned, but sold and now regret it?
I've bought and sold a lot of drums, but I'm glad that I didn't sell my first real kit of sonor's that I bought in 1973.
5. How did you first get
intested in your instrument?
I played the snare drum in my junior high band.

6. What are your influences
in the blues?
I was first exposed to the blues by hearing blues covers by the Beatles, Stones, Jimi Hendrix, Cream, Zeppelin, Allman Brothers.
7. Are there any particular
players on the world stage who have had an effect on your playing?
I loved Buddy Rich and he was one of my first major influences. I am also inspired by many other drummers, including Billy Cobham, Steve Gadd, Chad Smith, Neil Peart, and Vinny Coluaita. And I can't forget Ringo Starr, Charlie Watts, John Bonham, Keith Moon, Stewart Copeland. So many good drummers.
8. Can you recommend any
soundtrack/video/DVD of these players?
Just about everything by these guys is good as far as I'm concerned.

9. How would you describe the
type of sound you have or would like to achieve.
I'm pretty much an accompaniment drummer, and I just want my sound to fit the music.
10. If money was no object,
what equipment would you like to use at a medium sized gig? (50 seater)
I wouldn't change too much. A small 4 piece kit with 3 cymbals and hihats mic'd would be fine


11. What, in your view, makes
a player special/unique (past or present)
ability to groove, tasteful fills, decent chops.
12. What are your favourite
songs?
Aja by Steely Dan, Dear Prudence by the Beatles, Stormy Monday by the Allman Brothers, Scatterbrain by Jeff Beck, just to name a few.
13. How long have you been
playing?
Off and on for over 35 years.
14. Are you presently in a
group or working on any projects with other musicians? (name the other members
if you like and what they play)
I'm presently in a 4 piece band called Band on the Run with Phil Andrews on lead vocals and sax, Warren Grossman on guitar, and Lud Pasquale on bass. I also drum with Michael Mansour, and occasionally sub with Blues Side Up and The Devil Dawgs.
15. Do you like working in
the studio, prefer to go out and play, or both? (please elaborate if you can)
I haven't really had the chance to do studio work. I enjoy playing live, especially outdoor shows.

16. Are there any local
musicians that you would recommend to go and see play who you like the most?
Montreal has many excellent musicians. I always enjoyed seeing Jimmy James and his band with Dave Devine on drums. I must admit, however, that I don't go out to see live bands that often.
17. Which local musician(s)
have had an effect on your own playing?
Dave Divine inspires me.
18. How did you first get
involved with music? (ie. listened to a record, friend introduced you to an
album, went to a club to see someone play)
There was always music playing in our house when I was growing up. I remember listening to alot of my sister's Beatles collection.
19. Do you practice often
(ie. learn new songs, go over the ones you know, or just fiddle around?
I try to spend atleast one hour every few days on my practice pad. I listen to alot of different music. and then there are the band rehearsals. I'm a relatively lazy guy and I don't practice as much as I should
20.Share with us your ideal
gig (ie. large or small venue, do you like to get there very early to set up,
do you expect other band members to do the same, who does the sound or works
the board. – anything at all about your approach to playing)
I love outdoor shows, whether big or small. I like to get there early enough to set up and loosen up. I usually leave the sound up to someone else who has more expertise than I.
21. Is playing for you a job to be worked hard at, shear
pleasure, or a mixture of both?
It's a bit of both. While I enjoy playing, you need to work at it so that you can groove and be able to express your ideas on your instrument. It takes time and practice.
22. What do you think of jam
sessions? (please elaborate likes and dislikes)
I've been to some great jams, and I've been to some stinkers. Good jams have talented, grooving, unselfish musicians who are listening closely and don't let their egos get in the way. Jams are also a great place to meet musicians, and are an excellent place to play to an audience, especially for someone just starting out, or someone who just plays occasionally.
23. Do you prefer to work out
your music in advance, or do you like a certain amount of improvisation?

I like a little of both.
24. Have there been any
experiences that made you nervous on stage?
Sometimes, for no particular reason, I feel tense on stage, and I hate this feeling. Usually this feeling goes away after a few songs or the first set. I guess it's just nerves. Nevertheless, it's very irritating.

25. Is it more nerve-wracking
for you to play in front of friends, other musicians or a regular bar crowd?
Sometimes I find it's more nerve-wracking playing for friends. I guess I try too hard when they're there.
26. What’s the best or worst
gig you played?
I played the Canada Day gig in Morin Heights a few years ago that was alot of fun.
27. Do you have any other
anecdotes you could share with us. (pleasant or unpleasant)
About 30 years ago in a hotel bar in Kirkland Lake, Ontario, I vomited on stage during our rendition of "Babe", by Styxx. I had food poisoning, and I thought that night I was going to die. It was probably the longest night of my life. The poison was coming out of both ends. But incredibly enough, I was back on stage the next night. Perhaps I was a little queesy, but the show must go on.
28. What advice would you
give to an aspiring young player? ( ie. Technique, style, equipment etc.- any
mistakes to avoid?)
Take some lessons, practice alot, listen to all types of music, study videos and watch drummers live, go to jams, develop good listening skills, learn to groove and be in the pocket, and most importantly, have fun.

29. What’s your next
project/gig/musical experience? (give place and dates if you like)

Band on the Run at House of Blues Unik, June 19, 8th July, 5th August and 21st August 2010.

Maison du Blues Profile Interview with Ken Cohen













Maison du Blues Profile Interview with Ken Cohen


1. What instrument(s) do you play?

vocals ... guitar ... harmonica

2. What equipment are you using? (ie guitars, bass, amps, harmonica, drums, sax etc.)

Guitars
Fender made of strat parts , Ibanez archtop , Guild Acoustic , Yamaha nylon string .. Hopf archtop

Amps Polytone mini brute Fender Acoustisonic Fender Pro Junoir

Harps .. marine band

Mics shure 55


3. Have you modified your set-up in any way to better suit your style of playing.

sometimes I plug the guitars into a marshall blues breaker pedal

4. Is there any instrument that you owned, but sold and now regret it?

73 fender telecaster 73 fender twin amp 86 squire strat

5. How did you first get interested in your instrument?

Friends


6. What are your influences in the blues?

no money no women no friends ...
my first influences were actually Paul Butterfield and James Cotton and the Rolling Stones

7. Are there any particular players on the world stage who have had an effect on your playing?

see question 6

8. Can you recommend any soundtrack/video/DVD of these players?

anything found on you tube especially spider and the fly by the Stones

9. How would you describe the type of sound you have or would like to achieve.

living room volume is the best I can describe it .
I've been playing alone for a long time ... mostly in apartments and never wanted to bother the neighbours


10. If money was no object, what equipment would you like to use at a medium sized gig? (50 seater)

no idea I dont have that kind of experience


11. What, in your view, makes a player special/unique (past or present)

Class and approachabilty ...

12. What are your favourite songs?

Spider and the fly - Stones
Blues in the night - my version hahaha
Most of the Jazz standards that suit me

13. How long have you been playing?

longer than I like to think



14. Are you presently in a group or working on any projects with other musicians? (name the other members if you like and what they play)

No .. I just started going to open blues jams over the past few months to do vocals only

15. Do you like working in the studio, prefer to go out and play, or both? (please elaborate if you can)

I have no studio experience .. so a live audience would get my vote


16. Are there any local musicians that you would recommend to go and see play who you like the most?

Everyone at the open blues jams

17. Which local musician(s) have had an effect on your own playing?

None yet

18. How did you first get involved with music? (ie. listened to a record, friend introduced you to an album, went to a club to see someone play)

all the above

19. Do you practice often (ie. learn new songs, go over the ones you know, or just fiddle around?

all the above

20.Share with us your ideal gig (ie. large or small venue, do you like to get there very early to set up, do you expect other band members to do the same, who does the sound or works the board. – anything at all about your approach to playing)

no experience with gigs really ...
but I am a firm believer that if there is a vocalist it should not be a strain for him/her to be heard

21. Is playing for you a job to be worked hard at, shear pleasure, or a mixture of both?

shear pleasure

22. What do you think of jam sessions? (please elaborate likes and dislikes)

I am in love with Jam sessions
It the only place for now that I get to practice my so called craft

23. Do you prefer to work out your music in advance, or do you like a certain amount of improvisation?

I think a good balance of both works


24. Have there been any experiences that made you nervous on stage?

Just the first time i went to an open jam after a 42 year lay off


25. Is it more nerve-wracking for you to play in front of friends, other musicians or a regular bar crowd?

Other musicians

26. What’s the best or worst gig you played?

Both would be when I was 16 so its not worth mentioning.
GHtta love high school peer pressure

27. Do you have any other anecdotes you could share with us? (pleasant or unpleasant)

Ok here goes
When I was growing up I stuttered every second word .
Cool when your a singer ..
I was 15 or 16 and sang with a group we were trying to start in high school
We got a gig up north in Morin Heights or Val Morin at a local church dance
The bass player’s father jammed his station wagon with all our equipment and drove us up there from Montreal.
We got lost and had to ask for directions .
I had the window seat so I rolled down the window and asked a passer-by for directions ..
Here is the conversation the best I can recall

exc-c-c-cuse m-m-m-me b-b-b-but c-c-c-could y-y-y-ou p-p-lease tell us how t-t-t-to g-g-g-et t-t-t-to the church ?

The guy looked in the back of the station wagon and saw all the equipment and asked if we were playing there and what instrument I played ...

I said Yes and I was the s-s-s-s-singer ...

I dont remember seeing him at the gig ... lolol

We opened with My G-g-g-generation ...



28. What advice would you give to an aspiring young player? ( ie. Technique, style, equipment etc.- any mistakes to avoid?)

Play what you love ... use what you can afford and learn from your mistakes


29. What’s your next project/gig/musical experience? (give place and dates if you like)

I go to most of the Blues Jam nights in the city

30. Thanks Ken.

Monday, July 19, 2010

Contact Details:

If you would like to contribute to La Maison du Blues online forum, please send profiles,(ask for questionnaire if you need one) news, gig details, thoughts, ideas, reviews etc. - anything you think is relevant to Montreal blues to La Maison du Blues at:
rich2_lao@yahoo.ca
Your input is greatly appreciated.
Thanks

La Maison du Blues would like to thank all contributors.

Special thanks to Loan Do, Dan Geneau and Ingrid Auguste for their help in translating interviews into French.

Great thanks also to Ken Cohen (of Bob's Your Uncle) for his kind help and suggestions.

Dan Geneau, also of Bob's Your Uncle, deserves special thanks for his personal contributions in helping to provide link support to this website.

Appreciation also goes to Gerry Michel of Nova Blues Band for his particular advice and efforts to publicize the House of Blues.

Roger Guetta takes the foremost place for supplying practically all of the pictures on this website.

Maison du Blues wishes to thank Gerry Goodfriend of CKUT Radio for his support of the jam session.
Listen to his great Folk Directions show on CKUT 90.3FM Radio every Thursday from 9am-11am.

check out:

http://www.ckutfolk.com/